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Mediators of Inflammation
Volume 2014 (2014), Article ID 659206, 8 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/659206
Review Article

Chemokines and Chemokine Receptors in Multiple Sclerosis

Department of Immunology and Microbiology, Shanghai JiaoTong University School of Medicine, Shanghai Institute of Immunology, Shanghai 200025, China

Received 29 July 2013; Accepted 18 December 2013; Published 2 January 2014

Academic Editor: Mohammad Athar

Copyright © 2014 Wenjing Cheng and Guangjie Chen. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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