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Retracted

Mediators of Inflammation has retracted this article. After a concern was raised to them by a reader, the authors contacted the journal to replace the anti-ACC blot in Figure (b), providing the original figure. The journal found that the published blot in Figure (b) was similar in other articles [29]. Due to this, the journal reassessed the other figures and found that, for the β-actin bands in Figure (c), lanes 3 and 4 are similar to lanes 5 and 6, respectively. Although the authors provided the journal with the underlying blots for all the figures, the journal and authors decided to retract the manuscript. The replacement blot for Figure (b) and the underlying blots for all figures are available in the Supplementary Materials. The authors stated that the representative loading control bands in Figures (c) and (b) were improperly assembled, leading to repetitions of bands, and that these errors do not affect the results, once several papers have demonstrated that exercise does not change both, ACC [10, 11] and actin [1214] protein content, in the skeletal muscle of rodents. In light of the figure preparation issues, the authors sincerely apologize to the scientific community for any misunderstanding that these errors may have caused.

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Mediators of Inflammation
Volume 2014, Article ID 987017, 11 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/987017
Research Article

Treadmill Training Increases SIRT-1 and PGC-1α Protein Levels and AMPK Phosphorylation in Quadriceps of Middle-Aged Rats in an Intensity-Dependent Manner

1Laboratory of Exercise Biochemistry and Physiology, Health Sciences Unit, Extremo Sul Catarinense University (UNESC), 88806-000 Criciuma, SC, Brazil
2Faculty of Applied Sciences, University of Campinas (UNICAMP), 13083-872 Limeira, SP, Brazil
3Post Graduation Program in Motricity Science, Instituto de Biociências, São Paulo State University (UNESP), 13506-900 Rio Claro, SP, Brazil
4Human Movement Laboratory, São Judas Tadeu University, 03166-000 São Paulo, SP, Brazil
5Immunometabolism Research Group, Department of Physical Education, São Paulo State University (UNESP), 19060-900 Presidente Prudente, SP, Brazil
6School of Physical Education and Sport of Ribeirão Preto, São Paulo University (USP), 14040-907 Ribeirão Preto, SP, Brazil

Received 19 February 2014; Revised 8 April 2014; Accepted 15 April 2014; Published 9 June 2014

Academic Editor: José Cesar Rosa

Copyright © 2014 Nara R. C. Oliveira et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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