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Mediators of Inflammation
Volume 2015, Article ID 102476, 16 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2015/102476
Review Article

MPNs as Inflammatory Diseases: The Evidence, Consequences, and Perspectives

1Department of Hematology, Roskilde Hospital, University of Copenhagen, Køgevej 7-13, 4000 Roskilde, Denmark
2Institute for Inflammation Research, Department of Rheumatology, Rigshospitalet, University of Copenhagen, Blegdamsvej 9, 2100 Copenhagen, Denmark

Received 15 July 2015; Accepted 17 September 2015

Academic Editor: Dianne Cooper

Copyright © 2015 Hans Carl Hasselbalch and Mads Emil Bjørn. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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