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Mediators of Inflammation
Volume 2015, Article ID 120748, 10 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2015/120748
Review Article

Role of Ceramide from Glycosphingolipids and Its Metabolites in Immunological and Inflammatory Responses in Humans

1Institute for Environmental and Gender-Specific Medicine, Juntendo University Graduate School of Medicine, 2-1-1 Tomioka Urayasu, Chiba 2790021, Japan
2Infection Control Nursing, Juntendo University Graduate School of Health Care and Nursing, Chiba 2790023, Japan
3Laboratory of Biochemistry, Juntendo University School of Health Care and Nursing, Chiba 2790023, Japan
4Department of Dermatology, Juntendo University Urayasu Hospital, Chiba 2790021, Japan

Received 12 August 2015; Revised 12 October 2015; Accepted 15 October 2015

Academic Editor: Denis Girard

Copyright © 2015 Kazuhisa Iwabuchi et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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