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Mediators of Inflammation
Volume 2015 (2015), Article ID 124762, 11 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2015/124762
Research Article

Binding of CXCL8/IL-8 to Mycobacterium tuberculosis Modulates the Innate Immune Response

1Department of Cellular and Molecular Biology, University of Texas Health Science Center at Tyler, Tyler, TX 75708, USA
2Institute of Medical Biology, Polish Academy of Sciences, 93-232 Lodz, Poland
3Department of Immunology and Infectious Biology, University of Lodz, 90-237 Lodz, Poland
4Department of Immunoparasitology, University of Lodz, 90-237 Lodz, Poland
5Department of Immunobiology of Bacteria, University of Lodz, 90-237 Lodz, Poland
6Department of Medicine, University of Cincinnati Medical Center, Cincinnati, OH 45219, USA
7Department of Medicine, University of Texas Health Science Center at Tyler, Tyler, TX 75708, USA

Received 29 September 2014; Revised 7 January 2015; Accepted 7 February 2015

Academic Editor: Kiriakos Karkoulias

Copyright © 2015 Agnieszka Krupa et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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