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Mediators of Inflammation
Volume 2015, Article ID 128076, 15 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2015/128076
Review Article

Necroptotic Cell Death Signaling and Execution Pathway: Lessons from Knockout Mice

1Department of Pharmacology, Institute of Biomedical Sciences, University of São Paulo, 05508-900 São Paulo, SP, Brazil
2Department of Animal Science, Federal Rural University of the Semiarid Region, 59625-900 Mossoró, RN, Brazil

Received 27 December 2014; Revised 24 March 2015; Accepted 16 April 2015

Academic Editor: Laura Soucek

Copyright © 2015 José Belizário et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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