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Mediators of Inflammation
Volume 2015 (2015), Article ID 179616, 14 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2015/179616
Review Article

Botanical Drugs as an Emerging Strategy in Inflammatory Bowel Disease: A Review

CIBER-EHD, Department of Pharmacology, ibs.GRANADA, Center for Biomedical Research (CIBM), University of Granada, Avenida del Conocimiento s/n, Armilla, 18016 Granada, Spain

Received 6 July 2015; Revised 14 September 2015; Accepted 21 September 2015

Academic Editor: Francesco Maione

Copyright © 2015 Francesca Algieri et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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