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Mediators of Inflammation
Volume 2015 (2015), Article ID 293053, 10 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2015/293053
Review Article

The Role of Serine Proteases and Antiproteases in the Cystic Fibrosis Lung

1Centre for Infection and Immunity, School of Medicine, Dentistry and Biomedical Sciences, Queen’s University Belfast, Health Sciences Building, 97 Lisburn Road, Belfast BT9 7AE, UK
2Randox Laboratories Limited, 55 Diamond Road, Crumlin, County Antrim BT29 4QY, UK

Received 14 November 2014; Accepted 8 January 2015

Academic Editor: Nades Palaniyar

Copyright © 2015 Matthew S. Twigg et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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