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Mediators of Inflammation
Volume 2015 (2015), Article ID 418290, 8 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2015/418290
Review Article

Tumor-Induced Local and Systemic Impact on Blood Vessel Function

1Department of Medical Biochemistry and Microbiology, Science for Life Laboratory, Biomedical Center, Uppsala University, P.O. Box 582, 75123 Uppsala, Sweden
2Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Science for Life Laboratory, Rudbeck Laboratory, Uppsala University, 75185 Uppsala, Sweden

Received 4 September 2015; Accepted 25 November 2015

Academic Editor: Mathieu-Benoit Voisin

Copyright © 2015 J. Cedervall et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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