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Mediators of Inflammation
Volume 2015, Article ID 436017, 11 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2015/436017
Review Article

Central Role of Gimap5 in Maintaining Peripheral Tolerance and T Cell Homeostasis in the Gut

1Department of Molecular and Cellular Immunology, Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Research Foundation, MLC7021, Room S5.421, 3333 Burnet Avenue, Cincinnati, OH 45229-3039, USA
2Department of Genetics and Complex Diseases, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, MA 02115, USA

Received 29 July 2014; Accepted 15 September 2014

Academic Editor: H. Barbaros Oral

Copyright © 2015 Mehari Endale et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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