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Mediators of Inflammation
Volume 2015, Article ID 436525, 12 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2015/436525
Research Article

Chemical Hypoxia Brings to Light Altered Autocrine Sphingosine-1-Phosphate Signalling in Rheumatoid Arthritis Synovial Fibroblasts

1Division of Infectious Diseases and Immunology, CHU de Quebec Research Center and Faculty of Medicine, Laval University, Quebec, QC, Canada G1V 4G2
2Division of Rheumatology and Clinical Immunology, Royal Victoria Hospital, McGill University, Montreal, QC, Canada H3A 1A1
3Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, University of Moncton, Moncton, NB, Canada E1A 3E9

Received 15 July 2015; Accepted 26 August 2015

Academic Editor: Laura Riboni

Copyright © 2015 Chenqi Zhao et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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