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Mediators of Inflammation
Volume 2015 (2015), Article ID 563713, 7 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2015/563713
Research Article

Percentages of CD4+CD161+ and CD4−CD8−CD161+ T Cells in the Synovial Fluid Are Correlated with Disease Activity in Rheumatoid Arthritis

1Department of Clinical Immunology, Xijing Hospital, Fourth Military Medical University, Xi’an 710032, China
2Department of Neurology, Chinese Navy General Hospital, Beijing 100048, China
3Department of Geriatric Gastroenterology, Chinese People’s Liberation Army General Hospital, Beijing 100853, China
4Institute of Basic Medical Science, Xi’an Medical University, Xi’an 710032, China

Received 17 October 2014; Accepted 1 December 2014

Academic Editor: Lifei Hou

Copyright © 2015 Jinlin Miao et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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