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Mediators of Inflammation
Volume 2015 (2015), Article ID 701067, 11 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2015/701067
Review Article

Distinct Functions of Neutrophil in Cancer and Its Regulation

1Department of Developmental Biology and Cancer Research, The Institute for Medical Research Israel-Canada, The Hebrew University-Hadassah Medical School, 91120 Jerusalem, Israel
2Translational Oncology, Internal Medicine II, University Hospital, Tuebingen, Otfried-Mueller-Street 10, 72076 Tuebingen, Germany

Received 24 August 2015; Accepted 27 October 2015

Academic Editor: Ronald Gladue

Copyright © 2015 Zvi Granot and Jadwiga Jablonska. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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