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Mediators of Inflammation
Volume 2017, Article ID 7375818, 16 pages
https://doi.org/10.1155/2017/7375818
Research Article

The Lymphotoxin β Receptor Is Essential for Upregulation of IFN-Induced Guanylate-Binding Proteins and Survival after Toxoplasma gondii Infection

1Institute of Medical Microbiology and Hospital Hygiene, Heinrich-Heine-University Düsseldorf, 40225 Düsseldorf, Germany
2Molecular Medicine II, Heinrich-Heine-University Düsseldorf, 40225 Düsseldorf, Germany
3Institute of Pathology, Heinrich-Heine-University Düsseldorf, 40225 Düsseldorf, Germany

Correspondence should be addressed to Klaus Pfeffer; ed.uhh@reffefp.sualk

Received 14 February 2017; Revised 23 May 2017; Accepted 7 June 2017; Published 6 August 2017

Academic Editor: Célia M. A. Soares

Copyright © 2017 Kristina Behnke et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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