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Mediators of Inflammation
Volume 2017, Article ID 7510496, 12 pages
https://doi.org/10.1155/2017/7510496
Review Article

S1P Provokes Tumor Lymphangiogenesis via Macrophage-Derived Mediators Such as IL-1β or Lipocalin-2

1Institute of Biochemistry I, Faculty of Medicine, Goethe-University Frankfurt, 60590 Frankfurt, Germany
2Project Group Translational Medicine and Pharmacology TMP, Fraunhofer Institute for Molecular Biology and Applied Ecology (IME), 60590 Frankfurt, Germany

Correspondence should be addressed to Bernhard Brüne; ed.trufknarf-inu.mehcoib@eneurb.b

Received 12 April 2017; Accepted 15 June 2017; Published 19 July 2017

Academic Editor: Elisabetta Albi

Copyright © 2017 Shahzad N. Syed et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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