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Mediators of Inflammation
Volume 2017 (2017), Article ID 9478542, 14 pages
https://doi.org/10.1155/2017/9478542
Review Article

Neuroinflammation as Fuel for Axonal Regeneration in the Injured Vertebrate Central Nervous System

Laboratory of Neural Circuit Development and Regeneration, Animal Physiology and Neurobiology Section, Department of Biology, KU Leuven, Leuven, Belgium

Correspondence should be addressed to Lieve Moons; eb.nevueluk@snoom.eveil

Received 23 September 2016; Revised 5 December 2016; Accepted 25 December 2016; Published 19 January 2017

Academic Editor: Marta Agudo-Barriuso

Copyright © 2017 Ilse Bollaerts et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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