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Mediators of Inflammation
Volume 2018, Article ID 2037838, 12 pages
https://doi.org/10.1155/2018/2037838
Review Article

Gut Microbiome Dysbiosis and Immunometabolism: New Frontiers for Treatment of Metabolic Diseases

1Department of Pharmacology, Institute of Biomedical Sciences, University of São Paulo, SP CEP 05508-900, Brazil
2Department of Gastroenterology of Medical School, University of São Paulo, SP CEP 05403-000, Brazil
3School of Arts, Sciences and Humanities (EACH), University of São Paulo, São Paulo, SP CEP 03828-000, Brazil

Correspondence should be addressed to José E. Belizário; rb.psu@azilebej

Received 23 February 2018; Accepted 23 October 2018; Published 9 December 2018

Guest Editor: Fabio S. Lira

Copyright © 2018 José E. Belizário et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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