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Mediators of Inflammation
Volume 2018, Article ID 9321643, 7 pages
https://doi.org/10.1155/2018/9321643
Review Article

Gut Microbiota as a Driver of Inflammation in Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease

1Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, University of Sassari, Sassari, Italy
2Department of Gastroenterology, Catholic University, School of Medicine and Surgery, A. Gemelli Hospital, Rome, Italy
3CytoCure LLC, Beverly, MA, USA

Correspondence should be addressed to Giovanni Cammarota; ti.ttacinu@atorammaC.innavoiG

Received 5 May 2017; Revised 12 July 2017; Accepted 26 July 2017; Published 31 January 2018

Academic Editor: Jorg Fritz

Copyright © 2018 Stefano Bibbò et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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