Mental Illness
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Emerald Publishing
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Acceptance rate15%
Submission to final decision93 days
Acceptance to publication11 days
CiteScore2.100
Journal Citation Indicator0.220
Impact Factor6.3

Biopsychosocial Profile of COVID-19 Patients Cared for in Public and Private Health Facilities in Kandahar Province, Afghanistan

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 Journal profile

Mental Illness is an online-only, international, Open Access peer-reviewed journal which publishes scientific papers concerning the latest advances in the diagnosis and treatment of mental illness. All psychiatry-related manuscripts are welcome.

 Editor spotlight

Chief Editor Prof Domenico De Berardis is based at the ASL 4 of Teramo, Italy, and is currently researching alexithymia, schizophrenia, bipolar and anxiety disorders.

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This journal's articles appear in a wide range of abstracting and indexing databases, and are covered by numerous other services that aid discovery and access. Find out more about where and how the content of this journal is available.

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Research Article

A Cross-Sectional Study Exploring Mental Health among Patients Suffering from Dengue in Pakistani Tertiary Care Hospitals

Background. Dengue, known as “Tropical flu,” is a widespread disease that has recently become endemic in many Asian countries. Dengue disease still lacks research in many aspects, specifically the impact of patient factors and disease prognosis on mental health. This is a cross-sectional study that evaluated the impact of different patient factors on depression, stress, and anxiety in patients with acute dengue infection. Methods. An interview-based data were collected through a questionnaire containing patient sociodemographic parameters, clinical parameters, and DASS 21 questions. Independent sample -test, one-way ANOVA test, and post hoc test were performed to determine the degree of association of psychological manifestations with clinical signs and symptoms considering a level of significance of . Results. The patients from 39 years to 49 years of age had a higher association with stress, depression, and anxiety. The participants at primary and matriculation level education had a higher association with dengue-associated anxiety. Among the three levels of fever, i.e., mild (<102°F), moderate (102-103°F), and severe (>103°F), the participants suffering from severe fever experienced more anxiety and so was those with intense pain and stress. Conclusions. According to the DASS-21 tool, patients with severe pain and high-degree fever during dengue had significant stress and anxiety symptoms, respectively, than the patients with mild or moderate pain and fever. Middle-aged patients with low literacy levels were also found to have significant associations with stress, anxiety, and depression. To our knowledge, this is one of the first studies in Pakistan that in-depth explored the impact of patient factors’ variability on psychological illnesses related to dengue. These findings may warrant practitioners to integrate timely psychological screening and care for dengue patients.

Review Article

Physical Activity and Exercise as a Tool to Cure Anxiety and Posttraumatic Stress Disorder

Anxiety and posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) are the most prevalent psychiatric conditions and significant public health problems. However, research has tended to support claims that engaging in physical activity (PA) has beneficial psychological effects. The objective of this review is to examine exercise and PA therapies as a kind of PTSD and anxiety treatment. Exercise has been shown in interventional trials to be both anxiolytic and antidepressive in healthy individuals. Exercise and PA therapies have a variety of benefits and varying degrees of efficacy in treating PTSD and anxiety symptoms. PA has been shown to promote physical health; psychological health and a growing body of studies indicate that PA and general health are associated with PTSD and anxiety. These findings led to recommendations for exercise interventions as a safe, efficient, and effective therapeutic option for treating anxiety and PTSD symptoms. Studies have not, however, demonstrated that they can lower anxiety to the same degree as psychotropic drugs. Additionally, the majority of published studies have significant methodological flaws, necessitating the need for additional research to determine the ideal exercise modalities, frequency, duration, and intensity for enhancing the beneficial benefits of exercise on anxiety and PTSD.

Research Article

Stress Is Associated with Quality of Life Reduction among Health Professionals in Vietnam: A Multisite Survey

Stress in healthcare workers is increasingly common in recent times. Stress can have negative effects on the mental health and quality of life of healthcare workers. This study is aimed at measuring the quality of life and determining the relationship between quality of life and stress of health professionals in some hospitals in Vietnam. A cross-sectional descriptive study was conducted on 520 health professionals working at Hanoi Medical University Hospital and Thai Binh Medical University Hospital. The World Health Organization Quality-of-Life Scale (WHOQOL-BREF) and the Depression, Anxiety, and Stress Scale-21 Items (DASS-21) scale were used to assess the quality of life and the stress status of healthcare workers. Multivariate regression was performed to measure the relationships between stress and quality of life. Results showed that the level of stress of health workers according to the DASS-21 scale at mild, moderate, severe, and very severe was 10.7%, 8.7%, 5.6%, and 2.9%, respectively. The mean score of overall quality of life was . Health workers under stress had a decrease in quality of life scores in physical, mental, social, and environmental domains. Stressed health workers had a reduced quality of life. Attention should be paid to providing appropriate interventions to reduce stress and improve the quality of life in healthcare workers.

Research Article

Depressive Symptom Level, Sleep Quality, and Internet Addiction among Medical Students in Home Quarantine during the COVID-19 Pandemic

The COVID-19 pandemic has a major impact on the mental health of people around the world. Due to the possible impact of quarantine conditions on mental health, we decided to assess internet addiction, depressive symptom level (DSL), and sleep disorders among medical students during the quarantine of COVID-19. This cross-sectional study was performed among medical students during the COVID-19 quarantine in Iran. Participants were selected using the available sampling method. Sleep quality, internet addiction, and depression were assessed using an online survey of the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI), Internet Addiction Test (IAT), and Patient Health Questionnaire-9 (PHQ-9), respectively. Also, sociodemographic data including age, gender, marital status, smoking status, living circumstances, and educational status were asked. Participants were asked to share the link in their class social media groups. SPSS (version 16) was used for statistical analysis. Students participated; 64.9% of whom were female (), and the mean age of participants was 21.3 years. 74.1% of students’ educational status was not mainly clinical. 48.2%, 28.6%, and 27.1% had poor sleep quality, DSL, and internet addiction, respectively. Smoking (AOR: 3.49, 95% CI: 1.56-7.76), living with family (AOR: 1.75, 95% CI: 1.16-2.66), and using social media for more than 2 hours were defined as predictive factors for depression. 165 participants (19%) were diagnosed with both poor sleep quality and DSL. There was a positive correlation between PSQI and PHQ-9 (: 0.51, value <0.001). A positive correlation was observed between IAT and PHQ-9 (: 0.56, value <0.001). The rate of DSL, internet addiction, and poor sleep quality were increased and strong correlations between them were concluded. Variables of gender, GPA, and smoking status were the most important associated variables.

Research Article

Stress and Coping Mechanism among Students Residing in Private School Hostels

Background. Mental health problems can significantly impact a student’s academic performance, career, health, and future if they are not identified and managed in time. The poor mental health of young people is a global problem, including in Nepal. However, the scenario of perceived stress among adolescent students residing in academic hostels is not explored in Nepal. Therefore, this study aimed at determining the prevalence of perceived stress with its associated predictors, experienced stressors, and coping mechanisms among adolescent students residing in private hostels in Nepal. Methods. A cross-sectional study design was employed among all adolescent students of grades six to ten who resided in eight school hostels in Nepal. A total of 209 students responded to self-administered validated questionnaires for perceived stress (PSS-10) and coping scales. Results. More than half (51.67%) of the students experienced symptoms of perceived stress. Strict discipline in the hostel (77.03%) and groupism based on religion (5.26%) were the most common and least common stressors experienced, respectively. One-third of the students (, 33.5%) very often felt confident about handling personal problems. The presence of a mischievous element and neglect from friends were significant stressors determined. Seeking social support was the most used coping strategy over externalizing behaviours such as using bad words, yelling, and shouting. Conclusion. The study confirmed the presence of perceived stress among students living in hostels, where hostel residential factors were the predominant predictors. As a minority of the students can properly manage their stress, it is necessary to provide students with the appropriate educational counselling to help them deal with potential obstacles. Additionally, monitoring, increased communication with family and friends, and improving the hostel environment can be important in addressing students’ perceived stress.

Research Article

Time to Relapse and Relapse Predictors in Patients with Schizophrenia at Ayder Comprehensive Specialized Hospital, Northern Ethiopia

Background. Rehospitalization, treatment resistance, and impairment are all possible outcomes of a schizophrenia relapse, which has a severe impact on patients, families, and the healthcare system. However, little is known regarding the time to relapse and relapse predictors in Ethiopia and in the study settings. Therefore, the aim of this study was to determine the time to relapse and relapse predictors in patients with schizophrenia at Ayder Comprehensive Specialized Hospital, Northern Ethiopia. Methods. A retrospective cohort study was carried out among 273 schizophrenia patients discharged from Ayder Comprehensive and Specialty Hospital between January 2015 and January 2019. The data was taken from the patient’s medical record and was chosen using a systematic random sampling procedure. A standardized data collection checklist was employed. The survival experiences of participants were compiled using a life table. Both univariate and multivariate Cox regression models were used for variable selection. Finally, after confirming the model’s diagnosis and assumptions, factors with a value of less than 0.05 were declared to be statistically significant predictors of schizophrenia relapse. Results. In this study, the incidence of relapse was 2.9 per 100 person-months (PMs) and the median time to relapse of 13 months (interquartile range: 6–23 months). Being divorced (, 95% CI: 1.18-5.28), not adhering to treatment (, 95% CI: 3.03-10.74), and substance abuse (, 95% CI: 1.01-3.22) were risk factors for increasing schizophrenia relapse. Age (, 95% CI: 0.34-0.88) and length of first hospitalization (, 95% CI: 0.57-0.86) were factors that decreased schizophrenia relapse. Conclusion and Recommendation. In this study, out of 100 patients with schizophrenia followed up for a month, three had a relapse, and the highest risk factor for relapse was treatment nonadherence, followed by being divorced and substance misuse. As a result, it is advised that all parties involved focus on early detection and taking preventive measures against schizophrenia relapse, as well as providing regular psychoeducation about the significance of treatment adherence and connecting patients with substance misuse to substance rehabilitation centers.

Mental Illness
Publishing Collaboration
More info
Emerald Publishing
 Journal metrics
See full report
Acceptance rate15%
Submission to final decision93 days
Acceptance to publication11 days
CiteScore2.100
Journal Citation Indicator0.220
Impact Factor6.3
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