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Neural Plasticity
Volume 2012 (2012), Article ID 104796, 10 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2012/104796
Review Article

Mechanism of Repeat-Associated MicroRNAs in Fragile X Syndrome

Division of Regenerative Medicine, WJWU & LYNN Institute for Stem Cell Research, 12145 Mora Drive, STE6, Santa Fe Springs, CA 90670, USA

Received 29 November 2011; Revised 11 February 2012; Accepted 15 February 2012

Academic Editor: Hansen Wang

Copyright © 2012 Karen Kelley et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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