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Neural Plasticity
Volume 2012, Article ID 627816, 11 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2012/627816
Review Article

Interhemispheric Control of Unilateral Movement

1Department of Psychology, University of Montreal, Montreal, QC, Canada H3C 3J7
2Research Center, Sainte-Justine Hospital, University of Montreal, Montreal, QC, Canada H3T 1C5

Received 28 August 2012; Accepted 4 November 2012

Academic Editor: Matteo Caleo

Copyright © 2012 Vincent Beaulé et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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