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Neural Plasticity
Volume 2012, Article ID 874387, 7 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2012/874387
Review Article

Hippocampal Neurogenesis, Cognitive Deficits and Affective Disorder in Huntington's Disease

1Florey Neuroscience Institutes, Melbourne Brain Centre, University of Melbourne, Melbourne, VIC 3010, Australia
2Department of Anatomy and Cell Biology, University of Melbourne, Melbourne, VIC 3010, Australia

Received 3 April 2012; Revised 13 May 2012; Accepted 14 May 2012

Academic Editor: Cara J. Westmark

Copyright © 2012 Mark I. Ransome et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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