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Neural Plasticity
Volume 2012, Article ID 976164, 9 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2012/976164
Research Article

Hippocampal CA1 Pyramidal Neurons of Mecp2 Mutant Mice Show a Dendritic Spine Phenotype Only in the Presymptomatic Stage

1Department of Neurobiology, Civitan International Research Center, The University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, AL 35294, USA
2Department of Neuroscience, University of Torino and National Institute of Neuroscience, Turin 10126, Italy
3Neuroscience Institute, CNR, Pisa 56125, Italy
4IFEC-CONICET and Department of Pharmacology, School of Chemical Sciences, Cordoba National University, Cordoba 5000, Argentina
5Department of Pediatrics, The University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, AL 35294, USA

Received 15 March 2012; Accepted 23 May 2012

Academic Editor: Hansen Wang

Copyright © 2012 Christopher A. Chapleau et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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