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Neural Plasticity
Volume 2014, Article ID 454696, 12 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/454696
Review Article

Adult Hippocampal Neurogenesis in Parkinson’s Disease: Impact on Neuronal Survival and Plasticity

1IZKF Junior Research Group and BMBF Research Group Neuroscience, IZKF, Friedrich-Alexander University of Erlangen-Nuernberg (FAU), Glückstraße 6, 91054 Erlangen, Germany
2Department of Neurology, Friedrich-Alexander University of Erlangen-Nuernberg (FAU), Schwabachanlage 6, 91054 Erlangen, Germany

Received 15 May 2014; Accepted 19 June 2014; Published 3 July 2014

Academic Editor: Paul Lucassen

Copyright © 2014 Martin Regensburger et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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