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Neural Plasticity
Volume 2015, Article ID 138979, 14 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2015/138979
Review Article

Synaptic Plasticity and Neurological Disorders in Neurotropic Viral Infections

Department of Immunology, Institute of NeuroImmune Pharmacology, Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine, Florida International University, Miami, FL 33199, USA

Received 30 January 2015; Revised 16 June 2015; Accepted 18 June 2015

Academic Editor: Alexandre H. Kihara

Copyright © 2015 Venkata Subba Rao Atluri et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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