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Neural Plasticity
Volume 2015 (2015), Article ID 521398, 9 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2015/521398
Review Article

Magnetic Seizure Therapy for Unipolar and Bipolar Depression: A Systematic Review

1Service of Electroconvulsive Therapy, Department and Institute of Psychiatry, University of São Paulo, Dr. Ovídio Pires de Campos Street 785, 05403-903 São Paulo, SP, Brazil
2Bipolar Disorder Research Program, Department and Institute of Psychiatry, University of São Paulo, Dr. Ovídio Pires de Campos Street 785, 05403-903 São Paulo, SP, Brazil
3Service of Interdisciplinary Neuromodulation (SIN), Laboratory of Neurosciences (LIM-27), Department and Institute of Psychiatry, University of São Paulo, Dr. Ovídio Pires de Campos Street 785, 05403-903 São Paulo, SP, Brazil

Received 13 October 2014; Accepted 15 December 2014

Academic Editor: Ana C. Andreazza

Copyright © 2015 Eric Cretaz et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Abstract

Objective. Magnetic seizure therapy (MST) is a novel, experimental therapeutic intervention, which combines therapeutic aspects of electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) and transcranial magnetic stimulation, in order to achieve the efficacy of the former with the safety of the latter. MST might prove to be a valuable tool in the treatment of mood disorders, such as major depressive disorder (MDD) and bipolar disorder. Our aim is to review current literature on MST. Methods. OVID and MEDLINE databases were used to systematically search for clinical studies on MST. The terms “magnetic seizure therapy,” “depression,” and “bipolar” were employed. Results. Out of 74 studies, 8 met eligibility criteria. There was considerable variability in the methods employed and samples sizes were small, limiting the generalization of the results. All studies focused on depressive episodes, but few included patients with bipolar disorder. The studies found reported significant antidepressant effects, with remission rates ranging from 30% to 40%. No significant cognitive side effects related to MST were found, with a better cognitive profile when compared to ECT. Conclusion. MST was effective in reducing depressive symptoms in mood disorders, with generally less side effects than ECT. No study focused on comparing MST to ECT on bipolar depression specifically.