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Neural Plasticity
Volume 2015, Article ID 692541, 10 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2015/692541
Research Article

Preclinical Evidences for an Antimanic Effect of Carvedilol

1Neuropharmacology Laboratory, Department of Physiology and Pharmacology, Faculty of Medicine, Federal University of Ceará, Rua Coronel Nunes de Melo 1127, 60431-270 Fortaleza, CE, Brazil
2Laboratório de Neurociências, Programa de Pós-Graduação em Ciências da Saúde, Unidade Acadêmica de Ciências da Saúde, Universidade do Extremo Sul Catarinense, 88806-000 Criciúma, SC, Brazil
3Center for Experimental Models in Psychiatry, Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, The University of Texas Medical School at Houston, Houston, TX 77030, USA
4Psychiatry Research Group, Faculty of Medicine, Federal University of Ceará, 60430-160 Fortaleza, CE, Brazil

Received 29 August 2014; Revised 11 November 2014; Accepted 17 November 2014

Academic Editor: Rodrigo Machado-Vieira

Copyright © 2015 Greicy Coelho de Souza et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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