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Neural Plasticity
Volume 2016, Article ID 1347987, 10 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2016/1347987
Research Article

Astrocyte Hypertrophy Contributes to Aberrant Neurogenesis after Traumatic Brain Injury

1Department of Surgery, Texas A&M University Health Science Center, College of Medicine, Temple, TX 76504, USA
2Central Texas Veterans Health Care System, Temple, TX 76504, USA
3Department of Neurosurgery, Neuroscience Research Institute, Scott & White Hospital, Temple, TX 76508, USA

Received 10 November 2015; Accepted 11 February 2016

Academic Editor: Fushun Wang

Copyright © 2016 Clark Robinson et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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