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Neural Plasticity
Volume 2016 (2016), Article ID 2769735, 11 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2016/2769735
Review Article

Neuroplasticity and Repair in Rodent Neurotoxic Models of Spinal Motoneuron Disease

Department of Biomedical and Biotechnological Sciences, Physiology Section, University of Catania, Via Santa Sofia 64, 95125 Catania, Italy

Received 30 January 2015; Revised 12 July 2015; Accepted 19 August 2015

Academic Editor: Brandon A. Miller

Copyright © 2016 Rosario Gulino. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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