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Neural Plasticity
Volume 2016 (2016), Article ID 3136743, 12 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2016/3136743
Research Article

Salivary Cortisol Levels and Depressive Symptomatology in Consumers and Nonconsumers of Self-Help Books: A Pilot Study

1Centre for Studies on Human Stress, Research Centre, Institut Universitaire en Santé Mentale de Montréal, Montreal, Canada H1N 3M5
2Department of Neuroscience, University of Montreal, Montreal, Canada H3C 3J7
3Integrated Program in Neuroscience, McGill University, Montreal, Canada H3A 3R1
4Department of Psychiatry, Faculty of Medicine, University of Montreal, Montreal, Canada H3T 1J4

Received 22 June 2015; Revised 26 August 2015; Accepted 29 September 2015

Academic Editor: Jordan Marrocco

Copyright © 2016 Catherine Raymond et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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