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Volume 2016 (2016), Article ID 4129015, 12 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2016/4129015
Research Article

Anger Emotional Stress Influences VEGF/VEGFR2 and Its Induced PI3K/AKT/mTOR Signaling Pathway

1College of Pharmacy, Shandong University of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Jinan, Shandong 250355, China
2Experiment Center, Shandong University of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Jinan, Shandong 250355, China
3Technical Office of Pharmacology, Shandong Institute for Food and Drug Control, Jinan 250351, China
4School of Preclinical Medicine, Shandong University of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Jinan, Shandong 250355, China

Received 30 October 2015; Revised 6 January 2016; Accepted 11 January 2016

Academic Editor: Alexei Verkhratsky

Copyright © 2016 Peng Sun et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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