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Neural Plasticity
Volume 2016 (2016), Article ID 4131395, 14 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2016/4131395
Research Article

The Gate Theory of Pain Revisited: Modeling Different Pain Conditions with a Parsimonious Neurocomputational Model

1Center of Mathematics, Computation and Cognition, Universidade Federal do ABC, 09210-180 Santo André, SP, Brazil
2Basic Sciences, Albert Einstein Hospital, 05521-200 Sao Paulo, SP, Brazil

Received 16 May 2015; Accepted 19 August 2015

Academic Editor: You Wan

Copyright © 2016 Francisco Javier Ropero Peláez and Shirley Taniguchi. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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