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Neural Plasticity
Volume 2016, Article ID 4796906, 16 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2016/4796906
Research Article

Interhemispheric Plasticity following Intermittent Theta Burst Stimulation in Chronic Poststroke Aphasia

1Department of Psychology, University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, AL 35294-0021, USA
2Department of Neurology, University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, AL 35294-0021, USA
3Department of Neurology, University of Cincinnati Academic Health Center, Cincinnati, OH, USA

Received 3 July 2015; Revised 1 November 2015; Accepted 10 November 2015

Academic Editor: Adriana Conforto

Copyright © 2016 Joseph C. Griffis et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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