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Neural Plasticity
Volume 2016, Article ID 6097107, 11 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2016/6097107
Review Article

Neuroprotective Transcription Factors in Animal Models of Parkinson Disease

Center for Interdisciplinary Research in Biology (CIRB), Labex Memolife, CNRS UMR 7241, INSERM U1050, Collège de France, 11 place Marcelin Berthelot, 75231 Paris Cedex 05, France

Received 7 May 2015; Revised 10 July 2015; Accepted 14 July 2015

Academic Editor: Rosanna Parlato

Copyright © 2016 François-Xavier Blaudin de Thé et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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