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Neural Plasticity
Volume 2016, Article ID 6143164, 9 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2016/6143164
Review Article

Cochlear Synaptopathy and Noise-Induced Hidden Hearing Loss

1Department of Physiology, Medical College of Southeast University, 87 Dingjiaoqiao Road, Nanjing 210009, China
2School of Human Communication Disorders, Dalhousie University, 1256 Barrington St. Dalhousie University, Halifax, NS, Canada B3J 1Y6

Received 30 May 2016; Revised 9 August 2016; Accepted 21 August 2016

Academic Editor: Preston E. Garraghty

Copyright © 2016 Lijuan Shi et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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