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Neural Plasticity
Volume 2016, Article ID 6154080, 9 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2016/6154080
Review Article

Developmental Dynamics of Rett Syndrome

1Picower Institute for Learning and Memory, Department of Brain and Cognitive Sciences, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139, USA
2Laboratory of Neural Circuit Dynamics, Brain Research Institute, University of Zurich, 8057 Zurich, Switzerland

Received 27 September 2015; Revised 23 December 2015; Accepted 31 December 2015

Academic Editor: Graham Cocks

Copyright © 2016 Danielle Feldman et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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