Table of Contents Author Guidelines Submit a Manuscript
Neural Plasticity
Volume 2016, Article ID 6168245, 8 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2016/6168245
Research Article

Hemodynamic Response of the Supplementary Motor Area during Locomotor Tasks with Upright versus Horizontal Postures in Humans

1Department of Rehabilitation Medicine, Graduate School of Medicine, Nippon Medical School, 1-1-5 Sendagi, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8602, Japan
2Department of Rehabilitation Medicine, Nippon Medical School Chiba-Hokusoh Hospital, 1715 Kamakari, Inzai, Chiba 270-1694, Japan
3Department of Rehabilitation Medicine, The University of Tokyo Hospital, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8655, Japan
4Department of Physiology, Faculty of Medicine, Kindai University, 377-2 Ohno-Higashi, Osakasayama, Osaka 589-8511, Japan

Received 11 March 2016; Accepted 22 May 2016

Academic Editor: Jun Ueda

Copyright © 2016 Arito Yozu et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Linked References

  1. H. Fukuyama, Y. Ouchi, S. Matsuzaki et al., “Brain functional activity during gait in normal subjects: a SPECT study,” Neuroscience Letters, vol. 228, no. 3, pp. 183–186, 1997. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  2. I. Miyai, H. C. Tanabe, I. Sase et al., “Cortical mapping of gait in humans: a near-infrared spectroscopic topography study,” NeuroImage, vol. 14, no. 5, pp. 1186–1192, 2001. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  3. J. B. Nielsen, “How we walk: central control of muscle activity during human walking,” Neuroscientist, vol. 9, no. 3, pp. 195–204, 2003. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  4. T. Drew, J.-E. Andujar, K. Lajoie, and S. Yakovenko, “Cortical mechanisms involved in visuomotor coordination during precision walking,” Brain Research Reviews, vol. 57, no. 1, pp. 199–211, 2008. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  5. S. Della Sala, A. Francescani, and H. Spinnler, “Gait apraxia after bilateral supplementary motor area lesion,” Journal of Neurology Neurosurgery and Psychiatry, vol. 72, no. 1, pp. 77–85, 2002. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  6. S. E. Nadeau, “Gait apraxia: further clues to localization,” European Neurology, vol. 58, no. 3, pp. 142–145, 2007. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  7. V. S. Gurfinkel' and A. M. Él'ner, “Contribution of the frontal lobe secondary motor area to organization of postural components in human voluntary movement,” Neurophysiology, vol. 20, no. 1, pp. 5–11, 1988. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  8. F. Viallet, J. Massion, R. Massarino, and R. Khalil, “Coordination between posture and movement in a bimanual load lifting task: putative role of a medial frontal region including the supplementary motor area,” Experimental Brain Research, vol. 88, no. 3, pp. 674–684, 1992. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  9. J. H. Prost, “Origin of bipedalism,” American Journal of Physical Anthropology, vol. 52, no. 2, pp. 175–189, 1980. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  10. Y. Hara, S. Obayashi, K. Tsujiuchi, and Y. Muraoka, “The effects of electromyography-controlled functional electrical stimulation on upper extremity function and cortical perfusion in stroke patients,” Clinical Neurophysiology, vol. 124, no. 10, pp. 2008–2015, 2013. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  11. S. Obayashi and Y. Hara, “Hypofrontal activity during word retrieval in older adults: a near-infrared spectroscopy study,” Neuropsychologia, vol. 51, no. 3, pp. 418–424, 2013. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  12. M. Okamoto, H. Dan, K. Sakamoto et al., “Three-dimensional probabilistic anatomical cranio-cerebral correlation via the international 10–20 system oriented for transcranial functional brain mapping,” NeuroImage, vol. 21, no. 1, pp. 99–111, 2004. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  13. K. C. Hayes, “Biomechanics of postural control,” Exercise and Sport Sciences Reviews, vol. 10, no. 1, pp. 363–391, 1982. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  14. “WHO Multicentre Growth Reference Study Group and WHO motor development study: windows of achievement for six gross motor development milestones,” Acta Paediatrica Supplementum, no. 450, pp. 86–95, 2006.
  15. M. Bottos, B. Dalla Barba, D. Stefani, G. Pettena, C. Tonin, and A. D'Este, “Locomotor strategies preceding independent walking: prospective study of neurological and language development in 424 cases,” Developmental Medicine and Child Neurology, vol. 31, no. 1, pp. 25–34, 1989. View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  16. Y. Hoshi, N. Kobayashi, and M. Tamura, “Interpretation of near-infrared spectroscopy signals: a study with a newly developed perfused rat brain model,” Journal of Applied Physiology, vol. 90, no. 5, pp. 1657–1662, 2001. View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  17. G. Strangman, J. P. Culver, J. H. Thompson, and D. A. Boas, “A quantitative comparison of simultaneous BOLD fMRI and NIRS recordings during functional brain activation,” NeuroImage, vol. 17, no. 2, pp. 719–731, 2002. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  18. M. Wolf, U. Wolf, V. Toronov et al., “Different time evolution of oxyhemoglobin and deoxyhemoglobin concentration changes in the visual and motor cortices during functional stimulation: a near-infrared spectroscopy study,” NeuroImage, vol. 16, no. 3, pp. 704–712, 2002. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  19. M. Kameyama, M. Fukuda, Y. Yamagishi et al., “Frontal lobe function in bipolar disorder: a multichannel near-infrared spectroscopy study,” NeuroImage, vol. 29, no. 1, pp. 172–184, 2006. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  20. R. Takizawa, K. Kasai, Y. Kawakubo et al., “Reduced frontopolar activation during verbal fluency task in schizophrenia: a multi-channel near-infrared spectroscopy study,” Schizophrenia Research, vol. 99, no. 1–3, pp. 250–262, 2008. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  21. G. Jasdzewski, G. Strangman, J. Wagner, K. K. Kwong, R. A. Poldrack, and D. A. Boas, “Differences in the hemodynamic response to event-related motor and visual paradigms as measured by near-infrared spectroscopy,” NeuroImage, vol. 20, no. 1, pp. 479–488, 2003. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  22. M. Mihara, I. Miyai, M. Hatakenaka, K. Kubota, and S. Sakoda, “Sustained prefrontal activation during ataxic gait: a compensatory mechanism for ataxic stroke?” NeuroImage, vol. 37, no. 4, pp. 1338–1345, 2007. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  23. N. Hanaoka, Y. Aoyama, M. Kameyama, M. Fukuda, and M. Mikuni, “Deactivation and activation of left frontal lobe during and after low-frequency repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation over right prefrontal cortex: a near-infrared spectroscopy study,” Neuroscience Letters, vol. 414, no. 2, pp. 99–104, 2007. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  24. M. Hirose, H. Mochizuki, S. J. Groiss et al., “On-line effects of quadripulse transcranial magnetic stimulation (QPS) on the contralateral hemisphere studied with somatosensory evoked potentials and near infrared spectroscopy,” Experimental Brain Research, vol. 214, no. 4, pp. 577–586, 2011. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  25. H. Watanabe, F. Homae, and G. Taga, “Activation and deactivation in response to visual stimulation in the occipital cortex of 6-month-old human infants,” Developmental Psychobiology, vol. 54, no. 1, pp. 1–15, 2012. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  26. T. Furubayashi, H. Mochizuki, Y. Terao et al., “Cortical hemoglobin concentration changes underneath the coil after single-pulse transcranial magnetic stimulation: a near-infrared spectroscopy study,” Journal of Neurophysiology, vol. 109, no. 6, pp. 1626–1637, 2013. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  27. G. N. Orlovsky, T. Deliagina, and S. Grillner, Neuronal Control of Locomotion: From Mollusc to Man, Oxford University Press, Oxford, UK, 1999.
  28. M. Suzuki, I. Miyai, T. Ono et al., “Prefrontal and premotor cortices are involved in adapting walking and running speed on the treadmill: an optical imaging study,” NeuroImage, vol. 23, no. 3, pp. 1020–1026, 2004. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  29. A. Mirelman, I. Maidan, H. Bernad-Elazari et al., “Increased frontal brain activation during walking while dual tasking: an fNIRS study in healthy young adults,” Journal of NeuroEngineering and Rehabilitation, vol. 11, article 85, 2014. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  30. C. Brinkman, “Supplementary motor area of the monkey's cerebral cortex: short- and long-term deficits after unilateral ablation and the effects of subsequent callosal section,” The Journal of Neuroscience, vol. 4, no. 4, pp. 918–929, 1984. View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus