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Neural Plasticity
Volume 2016, Article ID 6427537, 9 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2016/6427537
Review Article

Synaptic Cell Adhesion Molecules in Alzheimer’s Disease

School of Biotechnology and Biomolecular Sciences, The University of New South Wales, Sydney, NSW 2052, Australia

Received 5 February 2016; Accepted 13 April 2016

Academic Editor: Preston E. Garraghty

Copyright © 2016 Iryna Leshchyns’ka and Vladimir Sytnyk. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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