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Neural Plasticity
Volume 2016, Article ID 6752193, 14 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2016/6752193
Review Article

Stress Response and Perinatal Reprogramming: Unraveling (Mal)adaptive Strategies

1Laboratorio di Neuropsicofarmacologia e Neurogenomica Funzionale, Dipartimento di Scienze Farmacologiche e Biomolecolari and CEND, Università degli Studi di Milano, 20133 Milano, Italy
2Harold and Margaret Milliken Hatch Laboratory of Neuroendocrinology, The Rockefeller University, New York, NY 10065, USA

Received 1 December 2015; Accepted 17 February 2016

Academic Editor: Menahem Segal

Copyright © 2016 Laura Musazzi and Jordan Marrocco. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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