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Neural Plasticity
Volume 2017, Article ID 3710821, 11 pages
https://doi.org/10.1155/2017/3710821
Research Article

A Combined Water Extract of Frankincense and Myrrh Alleviates Neuropathic Pain in Mice via Modulation of TRPV1

1Key Laboratory for Chinese Medicine of Prevention and Treatment in Neurological Diseases, Nanjing University of Chinese Medicine, 138 Xianlin Rd, Nanjing, 210023 Jiangsu, China
2School of Medicine and Life Sciences, Nanjing University of Chinese Medicine, 138 Xianlin Rd, Nanjing, 210023 Jiangsu, China
3Department of Anesthesiology, Zhujiang Hospital of Southern Medical University, 253 Gongye Rd, Guangzhou, 510282 Guangdong, China
4Jiangsu Key Laboratory for High Technology Research of TCM Formulae, Nanjing University of Chinese Medicine, 138 Xianlin Rd, Nanjing, 210023 Jiangsu, China

Correspondence should be addressed to Guang Yu; moc.621@829gnauguy and Zongxiang Tang; moc.361@1gnatgnaixgnoz

Received 28 October 2016; Revised 24 January 2017; Accepted 6 February 2017; Published 27 June 2017

Academic Editor: Fang Pan

Copyright © 2017 Danyou Hu et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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