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Neural Plasticity
Volume 2018, Article ID 8217345, 9 pages
https://doi.org/10.1155/2018/8217345
Review Article

Photoperiodic Programming of the SCN and Its Role in Photoperiodic Output

1Vanderbilt Brain Institute, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN, USA
2Department of Biological Sciences, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN, USA

Correspondence should be addressed to Douglas G. McMahon; ude.tlibrednav@nohamcm.g.salguod

Received 18 September 2017; Accepted 22 November 2017; Published 9 January 2018

Academic Editor: Harry Pantazopoulos

Copyright © 2018 Michael C. Tackenberg and Douglas G. McMahon. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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