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Neurology Research International
Volume 2012 (2012), Article ID 719056, 10 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2012/719056
Review Article

Understanding the Pathophysiology of Alzheimer's Disease and Mild Cognitive Impairment: A Mini Review on fMRI and ERP Studies

1Department of Clinical Neurophysiology, Neurological Institute, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Kyushu University, 3-1-1 Maidashi, Higashi-ku, Fukuoka 812-8582, Japan
2Department of Neurology, Minkodo Minohara Hospital, 3553 Kanaide, Sasaguri-machi, Kasuya-gun, Fukuoka 811-2402, Japan
3Department of Radiology, Hiroshima City General Rehabilitation Center, 1-39-1 Tomo-minami, Asaminami-ku, Hiroshima 731-3168, Japan
4Department of Neurology, Hiroshima City General Rehabilitation Center, 1-39-1 Tomo-minami, Asaminami-ku, Hiroshima 731-3168, Japan
5Department of Physical Therapy, Faculty of Health Sciences, Hiroshima International University, 555-36 Gakuenndai, Kurose, Higashihiroshima, Hiroshima 739-2695, Japan

Received 15 March 2011; Revised 11 May 2011; Accepted 15 May 2011

Academic Editor: Antonio Cerasa

Copyright © 2012 Takao Yamasaki et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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