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Oxidative Medicine and Cellular Longevity
Volume 2012, Article ID 128647, 8 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2012/128647
Review Article

Iron and Neurodegeneration: From Cellular Homeostasis to Disease

Instituto de Tecnologia Química e Biológica, Universidade Nova de Lisboa, EAN, Avenida da República, 2781-901 Oeiras, Portugal

Received 10 February 2012; Revised 21 March 2012; Accepted 5 April 2012

Academic Editor: Marcos Dias Pereira

Copyright © 2012 Liliana Batista-Nascimento et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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