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Oxidative Medicine and Cellular Longevity
Volume 2013, Article ID 120305, 12 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2013/120305
Research Article

Novel Hematopoietic Target Genes in the NRF2-Mediated Transcriptional Pathway

1Environmental Genomics Section, Laboratory of Molecular Genetics, National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences-National Institutes of Health, Research Triangle Park, NC 27709, USA
2US Environmental Protection Agency, Research Triangle Park, NC 27709, USA
3National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, Mail Drop C3-03, P.O. Box 12233, Research Triangle Park, NC 27709, USA

Received 10 January 2013; Revised 16 April 2013; Accepted 29 April 2013

Academic Editor: Hye-Youn Cho

Copyright © 2013 Michelle R. Campbell et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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