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Oxidative Medicine and Cellular Longevity
Volume 2013, Article ID 129645, 9 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2013/129645
Research Article

A Novel Sit4 Phosphatase Complex Is Involved in the Response to Ceramide Stress in Yeast

1Department of Genetics, University of Leicester, Leicester, LE1 7RH, UK
2Division of Biochemistry, Department of Biology, University of Fribourg, CH-1700 Fribourg, Switzerland
3Institut für Biologie, FG Mikrobiologie, Universität Kassel, 34132 Kassel, Germany

Received 10 May 2013; Revised 28 June 2013; Accepted 25 July 2013

Academic Editor: Joris Winderickx

Copyright © 2013 Alexandra Woodacre et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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