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Oxidative Medicine and Cellular Longevity
Volume 2013, Article ID 254069, 14 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2013/254069
Research Article

Exacerbated Airway Toxicity of Environmental Oxidant Ozone in Mice Deficient in Nrf2

1Laboratory of Respiratory Biology, National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, National Institutes of Health, Research Triangle Park, NC 27709, USA
2Tohoku University Graduate School of Medicine, Sendai 980-8575, Japan

Received 11 January 2013; Accepted 29 March 2013

Academic Editor: Mi-Kyoung Kwak

Copyright © 2013 Hye-Youn Cho et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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