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Oxidative Medicine and Cellular Longevity
Volume 2013, Article ID 367040, 9 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2013/367040
Research Article

Magnolia Extract (BL153) Ameliorates Kidney Damage in a High Fat Diet-Induced Obesity Mouse Model

1The Second Hospital of Jilin University, Changchun 130041, China
2The Kosair Children’s Hospital Research Institute, Department of Pediatrics of the University of Louisville, Louisville, KY 20202, USA
3School of Public Health, Jilin University, Changchun 130021, China
4The First Hospital of Jilin University, Changchun 130021, China
5Bioland Biotec Co., Ltd., Zhangjiang Modern Medical Device Park, Pudong, Shanghai 201201, China
6Bioland R&D Center, 59 Songjeongni 2-gil, Byeongcheon, Dongnam, Cheonan, Chungnam 330-863, Republic of Korea

Received 19 September 2013; Revised 31 October 2013; Accepted 6 November 2013

Academic Editor: Joseph Fomusi Ndisang

Copyright © 2013 Wenpeng Cui et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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