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Oxidative Medicine and Cellular Longevity
Volume 2013 (2013), Article ID 423965, 16 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2013/423965
Research Article

Enhanced 4-Hydroxynonenal Resistance in KEAP1 Silenced Human Colon Cancer Cells

College of Pharmacy, The Catholic University of Korea, 43 Jibong-ro, Wonmi-gu, Gyeonggi-do, Bucheon 420-743, Republic of Korea

Received 9 February 2013; Accepted 9 April 2013

Academic Editor: Jingbo Pi

Copyright © 2013 Kyeong-Ah Jung and Mi-Kyoung Kwak. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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