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Oxidative Medicine and Cellular Longevity
Volume 2015, Article ID 504253, 15 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2015/504253
Review Article

Role of Polyphenols and Other Phytochemicals on Molecular Signaling

Laboratory of Vascular Biology, Department of Biotechnology, Bhupat and Jyoti Mehta School of Biosciences and Bioengineering Building, Indian Institute of Technology, Madras, Chennai, Tamil Nadu 600036, India

Received 20 October 2014; Revised 30 December 2014; Accepted 31 December 2014

Academic Editor: Cristina Angeloni

Copyright © 2015 Swapna Upadhyay and Madhulika Dixit. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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