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Oxidative Medicine and Cellular Longevity
Volume 2015, Article ID 565140, 10 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2015/565140
Research Article

A Yeast/Drosophila Screen to Identify New Compounds Overcoming Frataxin Deficiency

1“Mitochondries, Métaux et Stress Oxydant”, Institut Jacques Monod, UMR7592 CNRS-Université Paris Diderot, Sorbonne Paris Cité, 15 rue Hélène Brion, 75205 Paris Cedex 13, France
2Unité de Biologie Fonctionnelle et Adaptative (BFA), UMR8251 CNRS-Université Paris Diderot, Sorbonne Paris Cité, 4 rue M. A. Lagroua Weill Halle, 75205 Paris Cedex 13, France
3Laboratoire d’Innovation Thérapeutique, UMR7200 CNRS-Université de Strasbourg, Faculté de Pharmacie, 74 route du Rhin, BP 60024, 67401 Illkirch Cedex, France

Received 24 October 2014; Revised 26 December 2014; Accepted 6 January 2015

Academic Editor: Cláudio M. Gomes

Copyright © 2015 Alexandra Seguin et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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